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The Underlying Problems of the Nintendo Switch OLED

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The latest Nintendo Switch model has arrived, complete with an OLED screen. Since its initial release, Nintendo has made a few changes to its hybrid console. We’ve already seen the Nintendo Switch V2, which had a longer battery life than the V1 but was otherwise functionally identical. Then there was the Nintendo Switch Lite, which was ideal for those who didn’t mind going without a dock in exchange for a significant price reduction. The Nintendo Switch OLED, on the other hand, has received the most significant upgrades in terms of technical specifications. What could a first-time Switch owner want more than an OLED and larger screen, a better kickstand, improved speakers, and a new dock design? But before you click that “Check Out” button, there are a couple of underlying problems that potential buyers need to be warned of.

Joycon Drift is Still Present

I’m sorry to say that the joy-con controllers’ drifting issues, which have plagued them for years, are still present on the new Nintendo Switch OLED model. There were rumors in the weeks leading up to the release of the OLED Switch that the newer version had a hidden improvement that solved the joy-con problem. While Nintendo has confirmed that the Nintendo Switch OLED’s joy-cons are more reliable than the launch models (also known as v1), it’s best not to take their word for it. Nintendo’s Technology Development Department stated that improvements that aren’t visible to the naked eye are still being made. However, they also stated that if the product is up to par, wear is unavoidable. Translation: Joy-con drift is still a problem that owners of the new Nintendo Switch OLED will have to deal with.

New Switch Means New Accessories

When the second version of the Nintendo Switch was released, the differences between it and the original were not discernible on a tangible level in terms of the product itself. The Nintendo Switch OLED, on the other hand, has a millimeter taller tablet than the Nintendo Switch. Many of the available accessories are rendered useless as a result of the increased height.

This isn’t necessarily a problem for those planning to buy the OLED model as their first Switch because there are already a few accessories designed specifically for the OLED Switch. It’s important to remember, however, that purchasing accessories like grips and cases that have been available for a long time is a bad idea because they’re most likely for the Switch V1 and V2 models.

Switch owners who want the OLED Nintendo Switch to be their second (or third, or fourth) console will have no choice but to invest in new and compatible accessories for their new console. Attempting to use grips and cases that aren’t designed for the Nintendo Switch OLED will only result in the device being nicked or damaged. New grips for the OLED Switch are already being developed by companies like Skull and Co. and Satisfye, so it shouldn’t be long before you can get your hands on them.

Should You Be Worried About Screen Burn-In?

The screen burn-in is one of the most common complaints about the Switch OLED model. According to Bloomberg, Samsung provided the screen for the Switch OLED, a company that has been at the forefront of OLED screen technology for the past few decades. The big question on everyone’s mind is whether burn-in will become an issue after a few years of using the Switch OLED. Burn-ins happen when displays show the same static image for a long time, as a general primer on how they happen. Phones, TVs, and almost anything with a screen are all affected.

However, we’ve come a long way from the days when displays could burn-in in just a few hours. The 7-inch panel is also arguably best-in-class in terms of longevity and reliability, thanks to Samsung’s manufacturing.

Overall, if you’re just going to use the Nintendo Switch OLED on a regular basis, you shouldn’t have any issues with screen burn-in. Limiting your brightness levels, playing a variety of games with different colour palettes, and not turning off the sleep timer are all ways to avoid screen burn-in. Overall, there are a few commonsense ways to make sure your Switch lasts longer, and burn-in shouldn’t be a deal-breaker for Switch OLED buyers.

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